October 31st, 2002

science, feynman

Right, I *needed* more IRC.

I have a RIM Blackberry 957, a little always-connected PDA-and-pager combo that work provides for on-call and entertainment value. They pay for flat-rate connectivity too, so I figure I might as well get some personal use out of it.

And what better personal use than being able to IRC from anywhere?

Unfortunately, it's not directly connected to the 'net -- any Internet-based applications on it have to communicate with gateway applications at the provider, via WAP. But it comes with a decent web browser, so for all practical purposes, the thing can speak email, WAP, and HTTP.

So I found Alan Cox's 'wapirc', which with a bit of tweaking works pretty well -- the IRC server and nickname are compile-time settings, so it's a little limited, but it's limitations I can live with. And the WAP was specific to his phone, so I've fixed that a bit too.

So anyhow, I can now IRC from anywhere. But I'm staring at this source code, thinking that it'd be neat if it did THIS and THAT and the OTHER THING. But it's a daemon and a CGI program in C. C is not a pretty language for writing things CGI in.

This means I have three choices:

  • Use it as-is.
  • Brush up on C well enough to maintain this.
  • Port the whole thing to Perl.

The second and third option have the advantage of giving me a neat project to work on; there's really nothing else like this out there, and I get the feeling Alan's not planning on preparing for general release. The first option has the advantage of not needing a bunch of effort for something that pretty much already works for me.

WWMLJFD? (And would any of you find a wap-irc gateway useful?)

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pinkie pie

(no subject)

I'd like to take this moment to be (as far as I can tell) the first to point out that

8 March 2003
is a hoax or publicity stunt.

Scroll down and look at the photo of the fire-damaged negatives he retrieved from the camera.

Now wonder to yourself why there were developed negatives in a camera.

My favorite parts are the ones like these:

"I'd been told by a friend that if the cursor ever moved by itself and there was a 'whirring' from the hard-drive, they were the sure signs that indicated someone was hacking into my computer."
"My eyes bugged with surprise as I heard a 'clicking' sound. Someone was tapping my phone."
Just think how distrubing it must be to be being monitored by an Classified Central Processing Agency which has the technology to monitor all of the search engines in the world, yet can't hack a Windows box or tap a phone without tipping off the person being monitored.

(Also, would you be surprised to learn that all of the "geographic" sites are the same server?)

And lastly,

"That was why they had tried to destroy the photographic evidence in the first place."
I hope when I get involved with a Classified Central Processing Agency, their operatives are as strategic as the villain in a James Bond film, like these ones are.

AGENT 99, YOU MUST ENSURE NO-ONE GETS THE FILM INSIDE THIS CAMERA. WELL, UM, WE TOOK THE PICTURES AND DON'T WANT ANYONE TO SEE THEM. YEAH, OK, I DON'T UNDERSTAND IT EITHER. NOW SHUT UP AND DESTROY THEM! REPORT BACK WHEN THE CAMERA IS HALF-MELTED AND THROWN OFF A CLIFF NEAR A TRAIL. WE WOULDN'T WANT ANYONE TO FIND IT.

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